Perinatal transmission of hepatitis C virus infection

@article{Indolfi2009PerinatalTO,
  title={Perinatal transmission of hepatitis C virus infection},
  author={Giuseppe Indolfi and Massimo Resti},
  journal={Journal of Medical Virology},
  year={2009},
  volume={81}
}
In industrialized countries, hepatitis C virus (HCV) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in children. Perinatal transmission is the leading cause of infection. Perinatal transmission is confined almost always to women with detectable HCV ribonucleic acid (RNA) in the peripheral blood by the polymerase chain reaction but all children born to women with anti‐HCV antibodies should be tested for HCV. Some but not all studies found that a high concentration of serum HCV RNA is… Expand
Perinatal transmission of hepatitis C virus: an update
TLDR
Investigation during pregnancy and infancy needs to be investigated more in order to design management strategies for perinatal transmission of HCV most effectively, and the recently approved new-generation, oral, direct-acting antiviral drugs may open a new era in HCV therapy for pregnant women and infected infants. Expand
[Hepatitis C during pregnancy, vertical transmission and new treatment possibilities].
TLDR
The course of HCV infection during gestation, the risk factors associated with HCV-VT, the diagnostic methods/clinical monitoring recommended and the new possibilities of treatment in the era of direct-acting antiviral agents are analysed are essential to guide future public health efforts appropriately. Expand
[Hepatitis C during pregnancy, vertical transmission and new treatment possibilities].
TLDR
The course of HCV infection during gestation, the risk factors associated with HCV-VT, the diagnostic methods/clinical monitoring recommended and the new possibilities of treatment in the era of direct-acting antiviral agents are analysed are essential to guide future public health efforts appropriately. Expand
Vertical transmission of hepatitis C virus: Current knowledge and perspectives.
TLDR
Though universal screening is controversial, selective antenatal HCV screening on high-risk populations is highly recommended and should be tested probably and future researches should focus on the interruption of vertical transmission, developments of HCV vaccine and direct-acting antivirals in infancy and early childhood. Expand
Hepatitis C virus infection during pregnancy and the newborn period – are they opportunities for treatment?
TLDR
Current HCV treatment options using pegylated interferon and ribavirin are both unsuitable for use in pregnancy and infancy, however, new agents currently in preclinical phases of development, along with the recently identified association between single‐nucleotide polymorphisms within the IL28 gene and treatment response, may serve to create a therapeutic window for patients. Expand
Prevention of mother-to-child transmission of hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus
TLDR
The possibility of reducing mother-to-child HCV transmission using newly available antivirals or antiviral in the pipeline for the treatment of hepatitis C is discussed. Expand
Exposure to hepatitis C virus early in life : Epidemiological and Immunological aspects
TLDR
Low awareness and prevalence of HCV testing in pediatric transfusion risk groups in combination with high HCV prevalence justifies active tracing screening of risk groups, and HCV specific T cell responses were studied in children born of mothers with chronic HCV infection. Expand
Perinatal transmission of hepatitis C virus in northern India
TLDR
Data on transmission of HCV infection from mother to infant in India are limited, but women attending the authors' hospital in the third trimester of pregnancy were screened for anti-HCV, and perinatal transmission ofHCV to newborns was detected in 29% of such cases. Expand
Screening of Newborns for Vertical Transmission of Hepatitis C Virus - A problem or a Myth
TLDR
There is no evidence of HCV transmission during delivery or post delivery, therefore, there is no need to modify the standard obstetrical practices such as type of induction, mode of delivery etc and the newborns should also be dealt normally as there are no chance of viral transmission from the baby to care providers like nurses, doctors or paramedics. Expand
Mechanisms and Prevention of Vertical Transmission in Chronic Viral Hepatitis
TLDR
The key to prevention with both viruses is screening women prior to and during pregnancy, including antiviral medications during the third trimester of pregnancy and HBV vaccine, as well as hepatitis B immunoglobulin administration to infants post-partum. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 88 REFERENCES
Maternal‐infant transmission of hepatitis C virus infection
TLDR
Pregnant women at high risk for HCV infection should be screened for anti‐ HCV, and HCV RNA testing should be performed if anti‐HCV is positive, and Infants of women with hepatitis C should be tested forHCV RNA on two occasions, between the ages of 2 and 6 months and again at 18 to 24 months. Expand
Possible role of high-titer maternal viremia in perinatal transmission of hepatitis C virus.
TLDR
The results imply that high-titer maternal viremia and normal spontaneous delivery may allow more HCV to infect the neonate intrapartum, therefore establishing perinatal transmission. Expand
Mother‐to‐infant transmission of hepatitis C virus
TLDR
This review summarizes critically the current world-wide literature focusing on the rate of mother-to-infant transmission of hepatitis C and expresses rates as a crude rate as well as a weighted rate. Expand
Transmission of hepatitis C virus from infected mother to offspring during subsequent pregnancies.
TLDR
The results indicate that a mother who has already delivered an HCV-infected baby is not at greater risk of infecting her second child, and data also indirectly confirm that the risk of horizontal transmission of HCV among siblings is low. Expand
Perinatal transmission and manifestation of hepatitis C virus infection in a high risk population
TLDR
HCV perinatal transmission was more frequent in infants Born to HIV-coinfected mothers than in infants born toAIDS-noninfected women, particularly when delivered vaginally, and when delivered by cesarean section. Expand
Perinatal transmission of hepatitis C virus from human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected mothers. Women and Infants Transmission Study.
TLDR
Women dually infected with HIV-1 and HCV but with little or no detectable HCV RNA should be reassured that the risk of perinatal transmission of HCV is exceedingly low. Expand
Increased risk of mother-to-infant transmission of hepatitis C virus by intrapartum infantile exposure to maternal blood.
TLDR
High maternal viremia, infantile hypoxia, and intrapartum exposure to virus-contaminated maternal blood increased the risk of HCV transmission during vaginal deliveries, and cesarean section may reduce the risk in selected cases. Expand
Transmission of Hepatitis C Virus from Mothers to Infants
TLDR
The transmission of HCV from infected mothers to their babies by analyzing HCV RNA in the blood was investigated, finding three of the 54 babies born to these mothers (5.6 percent) became positive forHCV RNA during the follow-up period. Expand
Transmission of hepatitis C virus to infants of human immunodeficiency virus‐negative intravenous drug‐using mothers: rate of infection and assessment of risk factors for transmission
TLDR
Analysis of a range of potential risk factors revealed that maternal HCV RNA load was important in predicting transmission, but suggested that other factors play a role in perinatal transmission from mother to child. Expand
Risk factors for perinatal transmission of hepatitis C virus (HCV) and the natural history of HCV infection acquired in infancy.
TLDR
If duration of membrane rupture and internal fetal monitoring are confirmed to be associated with transmission, interventions may be possible to decrease the risk of transmission. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...