Perinatal Depression: A Systematic Review of Prevalence and Incidence

@article{Gavin2005PerinatalDA,
  title={Perinatal Depression: A Systematic Review of Prevalence and Incidence},
  author={Norma I. Gavin and Bradley N. Gaynes and Kathleen N. Lohr and Samantha Meltzer-Brody and Gerald Gartlehner and Tammeka Swinson},
  journal={Obstetrics \& Gynecology},
  year={2005},
  volume={106},
  pages={1071-1083}
}
OBJECTIVE We systematically review evidence on the prevalence and incidence of perinatal depression and compare these rates with those of depression in women at non-childbearing times. [...] Key MethodDATA SOURCES We searched MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and Sociofile for English-language articles published from 1980 through March 2004, conducted hand searches of bibliographies, and consulted with experts. Expand

Paper Mentions

Interventional Clinical Trial
The pregnancy and postpartum periods can be joyous times in life; however, they can also be filled with challenging physical, emotional, and lifestyle changes. These changes may lead to… Expand
ConditionsPerinatal Anxiety, Perinatal Depression
InterventionBehavioral
Interventional Clinical Trial
Anxiety and depression is common along pregnant mothers and has been found to increase risk for negative outcomes in both mothers and infants. These risks can include low infant birth… Expand
ConditionsAnxiety, CBT, Depression, (+2 more)
InterventionBehavioral
Prevalence of Depression or Anxiety During Antepartum Hospitalizations for Obstetric Complications: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.
TLDR
The current meta-analysis suggests that one in three women hospitalized during pregnancy for obstetric complications report clinical levels of depression or anxiety symptoms, twice the reported prevalence of antenatal depression and anxiety in the general obstetric population. Expand
Prevalence and incidence of postpartum depression among healthy mothers: A systematic review and meta-analysis.
TLDR
There was no statistical difference in prevalence between different screening time points, but an increasing prevalence was observed beyond six months postpartum, and future studies should place equal emphasis on this neglected group of mothers so that targeted interventions and follow-ups can be introduced at appropriate time points. Expand
Prevalence and Associated Factors of Perinatal Depression in Ethiopia: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
TLDR
The pooled prevalence of perinatal depression in Ethiopia is far above most developed as well as developing countries, and much attention should be given to improve maternal mental health through reduction of identified modifiable factors. Expand
Prevalence of perinatal depression among Japanese women: a meta-analysis
TLDR
It is found that the prevalence of postpartum depression in primiparas was higher than that in multiparas and healthcare professionals need to pay more attention to primIParas than multipARas regarding post partum depression. Expand
Postpartum depression in India: a systematic review and meta-analysis
TLDR
A high prevalence of postpartum depression in Indian mothers is shown and more resources need to be allocated for capacity-building in maternal mental health care in India. Expand
Prevalence and determinants of antenatal depression in Ethiopia: A systematic review and meta-analysis
TLDR
A systematic review and meta-analysis of studies that examined the prevalence and associated factors of antenatal depression in Ethiopia found that those pregnant women who had a history of stillbirth, complications during pregnancy, previous history of depression, irregular ANC follow-up, and monthly income <1500 Ethiopian birr were linked with a greater risk of developing ANC. Expand
Prevalence and risk of mental disorders in the perinatal period among migrant women: a systematic review and meta-analysis
TLDR
Low social support, minority ethnicity, low socioeconomic status, lack of proficiency in host country language and refugee or asylum-seeking status all put migrant populations at increased risk of perinatal mental disorders. Expand
Focus on fathers: paternal depression in the perinatal period
TLDR
Focusing on fathers’ emotional well-being in the perinatal period is important in itself, as well as for their wives and children. Expand
Maternal perinatal anxiety: A review of prevalence and correlates
TLDR
There is a substantial evidence-based reporting prevalence estimates and identifying the key risk factors for maternal anxiety during the perinatal period, however, there is further need to synthesise the available literature in a meaningful way in order to translate findings into useful screening tools and intervention programs. Expand
The Evidence for Perinatal Depression Screening and Treatment
TLDR
Peripartum depression may differentially affect women in various cultural, ethnic, and/or socioeconomic groups and factors posited to account for these differences include variations in the types and severity of risk factors. Expand
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References

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Prevalence of Depression During Pregnancy: Systematic Review
TLDR
Rates of depression, especially during the second and third trimesters of pregnancy, are substantial, and clinical and economic studies to estimate maternal and fetal consequences are needed. Expand
A psychiatric epidemiological study of postpartum Chinese women
  • T. Chung
  • Medicine
  • The American journal of psychiatry
  • 2001
TLDR
The data suggest that depression may no longer be rare in the Chinese population after two decades of profound socioeconomic transformation, and a universal postpartum depression-screening program would be useful for early detection. Expand
A controlled study of the onset, duration and prevalence of postnatal depression.
TLDR
No significant difference in the point prevalence of depression at six months was found between the postnatal and control women, nor in the six-month period prevalence, but a threefold higher rate of onset of depression was found within five weeks of childbirth. Expand
Non-psychotic psychiatric disorder after childbirth. A prospective study of prevalence, incidence, course and nature.
TLDR
The prevalence, incidence, and nature of non-psychotic psychiatric disorder in the 12 months following delivery do not appear to distinguish it from such disorders arising at other times. Expand
Perinatal depression: prevalence, screening accuracy, and screening outcomes.
TLDR
Although many screening instruments have been developed or modified to detect major and minor depression in pregnant and newly delivered women, the evidence on their screening accuracy relative to a reference standard has yet to be systematically reviewed and assessed. Expand
Prevalence rates and demographic characteristics associated with depression in pregnancy and the postpartum.
TLDR
Depression during pregnancy was related to different sociodemographic variables than was postpartum depression, suggesting that depression at these two times may be associated with different psychological or etiological factors. Expand
Prevalence and correlates of postpartum depression in first-time mothers.
TLDR
Depressed women different from nondepressed women on several socioeconomic status indicators and the occurrence of obstetric complications, even in this low-risk sample, have implications for the assessment of depression in postpartum women. Expand
Depression during pregnancy and the puerperium.
Epidemiologic studies demonstrate a twofold higher rate of depression in women than in men. The childbearing years are a time of increased risk for onset of depression in women. Pregnancy,Expand
Comparative incidence of depression in women and men, during pregnancy and after childbirth. Validation of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale in Portuguese mothers.
TLDR
Comparisons of EPDS and SADS ratings showed that the translated EPDS was a valid instrument for women but it was less satisfactory when applied to men. Expand
A standardized interview that differentiates pregnancy and postpartum symptoms from perinatal clinical depression.
TLDR
Depression in pregnant and newly delivered women may be under diagnosed if caregivers attribute their complaints or symptoms to time-limited somatic conditions and overdiagnosed if clinicians use self-report measures solely, or without carefully interviewing women to separate the symptoms of depression from symptoms of pregnancy and postpartum. Expand
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