Performance of runners and swimmers after four weeks of intermittent hypobaric hypoxic exposure plus sea level training.

@article{Rodrguez2007PerformanceOR,
  title={Performance of runners and swimmers after four weeks of intermittent hypobaric hypoxic exposure plus sea level training.},
  author={Ferran A. Rodr{\'i}guez and Martin Truijens and N E Townsend and J. Stray-gundersen and Christopher J. Gore and Benjamin D. Levine},
  journal={Journal of applied physiology},
  year={2007},
  volume={103 5},
  pages={
          1523-35
        }
}
This double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial examined the effects of 4 wk of resting exposure to intermittent hypobaric hypoxia (IHE, 3 h/day, 5 days/wk at 4,000-5,500 m) or normoxia combined with training at sea level on performance and maximal oxygen transport in athletes. Twenty-three trained swimmers and runners completed duplicate baseline time trials (100/400-m swims, or 3-km run) and measures for maximal oxygen uptake (VO(2max)), ventilation (VE(max)), and heart rate (HR(max… 
The effect of intermittent hypobaric hypoxic exposure and sea level training on submaximal economy in well-trained swimmers and runners.
TLDR
It is concluded that 4 wk of intermittent hypobaric hypoxia did not improve submaximal economy in this group of well-trained athletes.
Effects of Hypoxic Training versus Normoxic Training on Exercise Performance in Competitive Swimmers.
TLDR
The results indicated that the hypoxic training method proposed in this study is effective for improvement of muscular strength and endurance in moderately trained competitive swimmers compared to control group, however, the method resulted in unclear changes in aerobic exercise capacity (VO2max), anaerobic power, and swimming performance of 50 m and 400 m compared to normoxic training.
Intermittent hypoxic exposure does not improve endurance performance at altitude.
TLDR
One week of IHE combined with exercise training does not improve endurance performance at a 4300-m altitude in male lowlanders.
Interval Hypoxic Training Enhances Athletic Performance and Does Not Adversely Affect Immune Function in Middle- and Long-Distance Runners
TLDR
Hypoxic training was more effective in enhancing athletic performance, and improving hemodynamic and ANS function; further, it did not adversely affect immune function in competitive runners.
Effect of intermittent hypoxia on muscle and cerebral oxygenation during a 20-km time trial in elite athletes: a preliminary report.
TLDR
Reductions in muscle oxy-Hb and systemic SaO2 occurring at exercise intensities close to maximal at the end of a 20TT were offset by IHE, although this was not translated into improved performance.
Efficacy of intermittent hypoxic training on hemodynamic function and exercise performance in competitive swimmers
TLDR
It is suggested that 6 weeks of IHT, which involved high-intensity continuous and interval exercise, can effectively improve exercise performance by enhancing hemodynamic function in competitive swimmers.
The Effect of High-Intensity Aerobic Continuous and Anaerobic Interval Training at 3,000 m Hypobaric Hypoxic Condition for Six-weeks on Aerobic and Anaerobic Exercise Capacity in Competitive Swimmers
TLDR
Results showed that the IHT method may be effective in improvement of exercise performance in competitive swimmers who participates in a variety of events from short to long distance.
Altitude Training in Elite Swimmers for Sea Level Performance (Altitude Project).
TLDR
A well-implemented 3- or 4-wk training camp may impair performance immediately but clearly improves performance even in elite swimmers after a period of SL recovery, through complex mechanisms involving altitude living and SL training effects.
Intermittent hypoxic training and cycling performance in triathletes
Athletes include altitude training as a complement to their conventional training to improve performance. The aim of the study was to analyze the effects on anaerobic threshold (AT) produced by an
Reproducibility of performance changes to simulated live high/train low altitude.
TLDR
Three-week LHTL altitude exposure can induce reproducible mean improvements in VO2max and Hb(mass) in highly trained runners, but changes in time trial performance seem to be more variable.
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