Performance of guinea fowl Numida meleagris during jumping requires storage and release of elastic energy

@article{Henry2005PerformanceOG,
  title={Performance of guinea fowl Numida meleagris during jumping requires storage and release of elastic energy},
  author={Havalee T. Henry and David J Ellerby and Richard L. Marsh},
  journal={Journal of Experimental Biology},
  year={2005},
  volume={208},
  pages={3293 - 3302}
}
SUMMARY The ability of birds to perform effective jumps may play an important role in predator avoidance and flight initiation. Jumping can provide the vertical acceleration necessary for a rapid takeoff, which may be particularly important for ground-dwelling birds such as phasianids. We hypothesized that by making use of elastic energy storage and release, the leg muscles could provide the large power outputs needed for achieving high velocities after takeoff. We investigated the performance… Expand

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