Performance in Mixed-Sex and Single-Sex Competitions: What We Can Learn from Speedboat Races in Japan

@article{Booth2018PerformanceIM,
  title={Performance in Mixed-Sex and Single-Sex Competitions: What We Can Learn from Speedboat Races in Japan},
  author={Alison Booth and Eiji Yamamura},
  journal={Review of Economics and Statistics},
  year={2018},
  volume={100},
  pages={581-593}
}
Abstract In speedboat racing in Japan, men and women compete under the same conditions and are randomly assigned to mixed-sex or single-sex groups for each race. We use a sample of over 140,000 individual-level records to examine how male-dominated circumstances affect women’s racing performance. Our fixed-effects estimates reveal that women’s race time is slower in mixed-sex than all-women races, whereas men’s race time is faster in mixed-sex than men-only races. The same result is found for… 
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