Performance, Personality, and Energetics: Correlation, Causation, and Mechanism*

@article{Careau2012PerformancePA,
  title={Performance, Personality, and Energetics: Correlation, Causation, and Mechanism*},
  author={Vincent Careau and Theodore Garland},
  journal={Physiological and Biochemical Zoology},
  year={2012},
  volume={85},
  pages={543 - 571}
}
The study of phenotypic evolution should be an integrative endeavor that combines different approaches and crosses disciplinary and phylogenetic boundaries to consider complex traits and organisms that historically have been studied in isolation from each other. Analyses of individual variation within populations can act to bridge studies focused at the levels of morphology, physiology, biochemistry, organismal performance, behavior, and life history. For example, the study of individual… Expand
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