Perfectly Concealing Quantum Bit Commitment from any Quantum One-Way Permutation

@inproceedings{Dumais2000PerfectlyCQ,
  title={Perfectly Concealing Quantum Bit Commitment from any Quantum One-Way Permutation},
  author={Paul Dumais and Dominic Mayers and Louis Salvail},
  booktitle={International Conference on the Theory and Application of Cryptographic Techniques},
  year={2000}
}
We show that although unconditionally secure quantum bit commitment is impossible, it can be based upon any family of quantum one-way permutations. The resulting scheme is unconditionally concealing and computationally binding. Unlike the classical reduction of Naor, Ostrovski, Ventkatesen and Young, our protocol is non-interactive and has communication complexity O(n) qubits for n a security parameter. 

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