Perceptual and acoustic differences between authentic and acted nonverbal emotional vocalizations

@article{Anikin2018PerceptualAA,
  title={Perceptual and acoustic differences between authentic and acted nonverbal emotional vocalizations},
  author={Andrey Anikin and C{\'e}sar F. Lima},
  journal={Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology},
  year={2018},
  volume={71},
  pages={622 - 641}
}
  • Andrey Anikin, C. Lima
  • Published 9 January 2017
  • Psychology
  • Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology
Most research on nonverbal emotional vocalizations is based on actor portrayals, but how similar are they to the vocalizations produced spontaneously in everyday life? Perceptual and acoustic differences have been discovered between spontaneous and volitional laughs, but little is known about other emotions. We compared 362 acted vocalizations from seven corpora with 427 authentic vocalizations using acoustic analysis, and 278 vocalizations (139 authentic and 139 acted) were also tested in a… 

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