Perceptions of cancer fatalism among African Americans: the influence of education, income, and cancer knowledge.

@article{Powe1994PerceptionsOC,
  title={Perceptions of cancer fatalism among African Americans: the influence of education, income, and cancer knowledge.},
  author={Barbara D. Powe},
  journal={Journal of National Black Nurses' Association : JNBNA},
  year={1994},
  volume={7 2},
  pages={41-8}
}
  • Barbara D. Powe
  • Published 1994 in
    Journal of National Black Nurses' Association…
African Americans have greater colorectal cancer mortality rates, yet are less likely to participate in fecal occult blood testing (FOBT). Perceptions of cancer fatalism play a pivotal role in this lack of participation. Cancer fatalism is the belief that death is inevitable when cancer is present. However, predictors of cancer fatalism have not been consistently articulated. The Powe Fatalism Model guided this descriptive, correlational study which reports on the relationship between education… CONTINUE READING

Citations

Publications citing this paper.
Showing 1-10 of 22 extracted citations

Culturally targeted patient navigation for increasing african americans' adherence to screening colonoscopy: a randomized clinical trial.

Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology • 2013

Similar Papers

Loading similar papers…