Perceived timing of vestibular stimulation relative to touch, light and sound

@article{BarnettCowan2009PerceivedTO,
  title={Perceived timing of vestibular stimulation relative to touch, light and sound},
  author={Michael Barnett-Cowan and Laurence R. Harris},
  journal={Experimental Brain Research},
  year={2009},
  volume={198},
  pages={221-231}
}
Different senses have different processing times. Here we measured the perceived timing of galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) relative to tactile, visual and auditory stimuli. Simple reaction times for perceived head movement (438 ± 49 ms) were significantly longer than to touches (245 ± 14 ms), lights (220 ± 13 ms), or sounds (197 ± 13 ms). Temporal order and simultaneity judgments both indicated that GVS had to occur about 160 ms before other stimuli to be perceived as simultaneous with… Expand
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Fore–aft translation aftereffects
  • B. Crane
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Experimental Brain Research
  • 2012
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