Perceived naturalness and evoked disgust influence acceptance of cultured meat.

@article{Siegrist2018PerceivedNA,
  title={Perceived naturalness and evoked disgust influence acceptance of cultured meat.},
  author={M. Siegrist and Bernadette S{\"u}tterlin and C. Hartmann},
  journal={Meat science},
  year={2018},
  volume={139},
  pages={
          213-219
        }
}
Cultured meat could be a more environment- and animal-friendly alternative to conventional meat. However, in addition to the technological challenges, the lack of consumer acceptance could be a major barrier to the introduction of cultured meat. Therefore, it seems wise to take into account consumer concerns at an early stage of product development. In this regard, we conducted two experiments that examined the impact of perceived naturalness and disgust on consumer acceptance of cultured meat… Expand

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