Perceived hearing aid benefit in relation to perceived needs.

@article{Schum1999PerceivedHA,
  title={Perceived hearing aid benefit in relation to perceived needs.},
  author={Donald J. Schum},
  journal={Journal of the American Academy of Audiology},
  year={1999},
  volume={10 1},
  pages={
          40-5
        }
}
  • D. Schum
  • Published 1 January 1999
  • Psychology
  • Journal of the American Academy of Audiology
A new scale, the Hearing Aid Needs Assessment (HANA), was developed in order to examine the relationship between perceived communication needs/expectations with the actual benefit eventually achieved with newly fitted hearing aids. A serial sample of 82 patients completed the HANA prior to hearing aid consultation. A subgroup of 42 patients eventually completed the Hearing Aid Performance Inventory after 2 to 3 months of new device use. The results indicated that candidates for amplification… 

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