Perceived extrinsic mortality risk and reported effort in looking after health: testing a behavioral ecological prediction.

@article{Pepper2014PerceivedEM,
  title={Perceived extrinsic mortality risk and reported effort in looking after health: testing a behavioral ecological prediction.},
  author={Gillian V. Pepper and Daniel Nettle},
  journal={Human nature},
  year={2014},
  volume={25 3},
  pages={378-92}
}
Socioeconomic gradients in health behavior are pervasive and well documented. Yet, there is little consensus on their causes. Behavioral ecological theory predicts that, if people of lower socioeconomic position (SEP) perceive greater personal extrinsic mortality risk than those of higher SEP, they should disinvest in their future health. We surveyed North American adults for reported effort in looking after health, perceived extrinsic and intrinsic mortality risks, and measures of SEP. We… CONTINUE READING
Related Discussions
This paper has been referenced on Twitter 12 times. VIEW TWEETS

From This Paper

Figures and tables from this paper.

Citations

Publications citing this paper.
Showing 1-10 of 15 extracted citations

A matter of perception: Perceived socio-economic status and cortisol on the island of Utila, Honduras.

American journal of human biology : the official journal of the Human Biology Council • 2017
View 1 Excerpt

References

Publications referenced by this paper.
Showing 1-10 of 65 references

Flexibility in reproductive timing in human females: integrating ultimate and proximate explanations.

Philosophical transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological sciences • 2011
View 1 Excerpt

Similar Papers

Loading similar papers…