Peptic Ulcer Disease and the Risk of Bladder Cancer in a Prospective Study of Male Health Professionals

@article{Michaud2004PepticUD,
  title={Peptic Ulcer Disease and the Risk of Bladder Cancer in a Prospective Study of Male Health Professionals},
  author={Dominique S. Michaud and Pauline A. Mysliwiec and Walid H. Aldoori and Walter C. Willett and Edward L. Giovannucci},
  journal={Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers \& Prevention},
  year={2004},
  volume={13},
  pages={250 - 254}
}
Helicobacter pylori is a risk factor for gastric and duodenal ulcers, but gastric ulcers generally occur in individuals who have low acid production and diffuse gastritis, whereas duodenal ulcers are more likely to occur with high acid output and antrum-predominant gastritis. Low acid production, gastritis, and ulcer healing each contribute to poor antioxidant absorption, oxidative stress, and elevated nitrite levels in the stomach. N-Nitrosamines are known carcinogens, and nitrate ingestion… 

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