Penetration of remnant edges by noisy miners (Manorina melanocephala) and implications for habitat restoration

@article{Clarke2007PenetrationOR,
  title={Penetration of remnant edges by noisy miners (Manorina melanocephala) and implications for habitat restoration},
  author={Michael F. Clarke and Joanne M. Oldland},
  journal={Wildlife Research},
  year={2007},
  volume={34},
  pages={253-261}
}
The noisy miner (Manorina melanocephala) is a large, communally breeding colonial native honeyeater renowned for aggressively excluding virtually all other bird species from areas they occupy. In the woodlands of southern and eastern Australia, numerous studies have identified the domination of remnants by noisy miners as having a profound negative effect on woodland bird communities. Despite this, very little is known about the habitat characteristics that make domination of a site by noisy… 

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