Pelvic organ prolapse

@article{Jelovsek2007PelvicOP,
  title={Pelvic organ prolapse},
  author={John Eric Jelovsek and Christopher Maher and Matthew D Barber},
  journal={The Lancet},
  year={2007},
  volume={369},
  pages={1027-1038}
}
Pelvic organ prolapse is downward descent of female pelvic organs, including the bladder, uterus or post-hysterectomy vaginal cuff, and the small or large bowel, resulting in protrusion of the vagina, uterus, or both. Prolapse development is multifactorial, with vaginal child birth, advancing age, and increasing body-mass index as the most consistent risk factors. Vaginal delivery, hysterectomy, chronic straining, normal ageing, and abnormalities of connective tissue or connective-tissue repair… Expand
Overview of pelvic floor failure and associated problems
TLDR
The aim of this review is to highlight the clinical importance of prolapse, its pathophysiology, and different modalities for diagnosis and treatment. Expand
Should Asymptomatic Anterior Pelvic Organ Prolapse Be Corrected to Treat Irritative Urinary Symptoms?
TLDR
There does not seem to be any absolute justification for the surgical correction of otherwise asymptomatic pelvic support defects, and no other symptoms, urinary or otherwise, are reliably influenced by correction of anatomical defects of pelvic support. Expand
Symptoms and Outcome Measures of Pelvic Organ Prolapse
  • M. Barber
  • Medicine
  • Clinical obstetrics and gynecology
  • 2005
TLDR
The evaluation of a patient with vaginal prolapse requires a comprehensive review of the full spectrum of pelvic floor symptoms and an assessment of how these symptoms affect their quality of life. Expand
Vaginal Changes Due to Varying Degrees of Rectocele Prolapse: A Computational Study.
TLDR
A full-scale magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) based three-dimensional (3D) computational model of the female pelvic anatomy, comprising the vaginal canal, uterus, and rectum, was developed to study the effect of varying degrees (or sizes) of rectocele prolapse on the vaginal Canal for the first time. Expand
Recurrent Pelvic Organ Prolapse
TLDR
It is found that women who seek treatment for the management of advanced prolapse have a decreased sense of body image and quality of life. Expand
Pelvic Floor Disorders
TLDR
Findings and trends help highlight the importance of pelvic floor disorders and the role of the colorectal specialist in the management of pelvicfloor disorders. Expand
Conservative prevention and management of pelvic organ prolapse in women.
TLDR
There is now some evidence available indicating a positive effect of PFMT for prolapse symptoms and severity, and the largest most rigorous trial to date suggests that six months of supervised PFMT has benefits in terms of anatomical and symptom improvement. Expand
Alloplastic Implants for the Treatment of Stress Urinary Incontinence and Pelvic Organ Prolapse
Stress urinary incontinence (SUI) is the complaint of involuntary leakage with effort or exertion or with sneezing or coughing [1]. Urethral hypermobility, which permits urethral opening duringExpand
Surgery for Stress Urinary Incontinence and Pelvic Organ Prolapse
TLDR
The pubovaginal sling and the retropubic mid-urethral sling have emerged as the procedures of choice for women with SUI and Objective and subjective outcomes appear to be similar for mesh-augmented and native tissue repairs in the posterior compartment. Expand
Surgical management of pelvic organ prolapse in women.
TLDR
Meta-analysis on the impact of continence surgery at the time of prolapse surgery was performed with data from seven studies, and abdominal sacral colpopexy was associated with a lower rate of recurrent vault prolapse and dyspareunia than with vaginal sacrospinous col popexy. Expand
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References

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Symptoms and Outcome Measures of Pelvic Organ Prolapse
  • M. Barber
  • Medicine
  • Clinical obstetrics and gynecology
  • 2005
TLDR
The evaluation of a patient with vaginal prolapse requires a comprehensive review of the full spectrum of pelvic floor symptoms and an assessment of how these symptoms affect their quality of life. Expand
Pelvic Symptoms in Women With Pelvic Organ Prolapse
TLDR
Women with more advanced prolapse were less likely to have stress incontinence and more likely to manually reduce prolapse to void; however, prolapse severity was not associated with sexual or bowel symptoms. Expand
Etiology of Pelvic Organ Prolapse
TLDR
If increased emphasis is placed on careful evaluation of symptoms and directed prolapse examination, the practitioner is likely to identify many symptomatic women who would benefit from nonsurgical or surgical therapy. Expand
Management of the urethral outlet in patients with severe prolapse
TLDR
This mix of obstructed, overactive bladder with hidden stress incontinence increases with degree of POP, and all women with severe prolapse will fair best if evaluated for all three conditions prior to surgical repair. Expand
Pelvic Organ Prolapse in Older Women: Prevalence and Risk Factors
TLDR
Some degree of pelvic organ prolapse is nearly ubiquitous in older women, which should be considered in the development of clinically relevant definitions of prolapse. Expand
Is Pelvic Organ Prolapse a Cause of Pelvic or Low Back Pain?
TLDR
Pelvic organ prolapse is not a cause of pelvic or low back pain and linear or nonlinear associations between pelvic organ prolapses and pelvic pain are not found. Expand
Abnormal spinal curvature and its relationship to pelvic organ prolapse.
TLDR
An abnormal change in spinal curvature, specifically, a loss of lumbar lordosis, appears to be a significant risk factor in the development of pelvic organ prolapse. Expand
Surgical management of pelvic organ prolapse in women.
TLDR
Meta-analysis on the impact of pelvic organ prolapse surgery on continence issues was limited and inconclusive, although about 10% of women developed new symptoms after surgery, and benefits must be balanced against a longer operating time, longer time to return to activities of daily living and increased cost of the abdominal approach. Expand
Surgical management of pelvic organ prolapse in women.
TLDR
Abdominal sacrocol popexy is associated with a lower rate of recurrent vault prolapse and dyspareunia than the vaginal sacrospinous colpopexy and Posterior vaginal wall repair may be better than transanal repair in the management of rectoceles in terms of recurrence of prolapse. Expand
Epidemiologic evaluation of reoperation for surgically treated pelvic organ prolapse and urinary incontinence.
TLDR
Future reoperation is a significant risk of morbidity for women who undergo pelvic organ prolapse and urinary incontinence surgery, and no association was observed with age, body mass index, parity, previous hysterectomy not for prolapse, vaginal versus abdominal approach, severity of prolapse. Expand
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