Pelvic floor trauma in childbirth – Myth or reality?

@article{Dietz2005PelvicFT,
  title={Pelvic floor trauma in childbirth – Myth or reality?},
  author={Hans Peter Dietz and Lore Schierlitz},
  journal={Australian and New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology},
  year={2005},
  volume={45}
}
  • H. Dietz, L. Schierlitz
  • Published 1 February 2005
  • Medicine
  • Australian and New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology
The issue of traumatic damage to the pelvic floor in childbirth is attracting more and more attention amongst obstetric caregivers and laypersons alike. This is partly due to the fact that elective Caesarean section, as a potentially preventative intervention, is increasingly available and perceived as safe. As there are a multitude of emotive issues involved, including health economics and the relative roles of healthcare providers, the discussion surrounding pelvic floor trauma in childbirth… 
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