Pelvic floor muscle training versus no treatment, or inactive control treatments, for urinary incontinence in women.

@article{HaySmith2006PelvicFM,
  title={Pelvic floor muscle training versus no treatment, or inactive control treatments, for urinary incontinence in women.},
  author={E. Jean C. Hay-Smith and Chantale Dumoulin},
  journal={The Cochrane database of systematic reviews},
  year={2006},
  volume={1},
  pages={
          CD005654
        }
}
BACKGROUND Pelvic floor muscle training is the most commonly used physical therapy treatment for women with stress urinary incontinence. It is sometimes recommended for mixed and less commonly urge urinary incontinence. OBJECTIVES To determine the effects of pelvic floor muscle training for women with urinary incontinence in comparison to no treatment, placebo or sham treatments, or other inactive control treatments. SEARCH STRATEGY The Cochrane Incontinence Group Specialised Trials… 
Pelvic floor muscle training versus no treatment, or inactive control treatments, for urinary incontinence in women.
TLDR
The treatment effect seems greater in women with stress urinary incontinence alone, who participate in a supervised PFMT programme for at least three months, but these and other uncertainties require testing in further trials.
Comparisons of approaches to pelvic floor muscle training for urinary incontinence in women.
TLDR
The existing evidence was insufficient to make any strong recommendations about the best approach to pelvic floor muscle training, and it is suggested that women are offered reasonably frequent appointments during the training period.
Pelvic floor muscle training added to another active treatment versus the same active treatment alone for urinary incontinence in women.
TLDR
This systematic review evaluated the effects of adding PFMT to any other active treatment for urinary incontinence in women and rated the quality of evidence, using the GRADE approach, as either low or very low.
Feedback or biofeedback to augment pelvic floor muscle training for urinary incontinence in women.
TLDR
Women who received biofeedback were significantly more likely to report that their urinary incontinence was cured or improved compared to those who received PFMT alone, and it was common for women in the bio feedback arms to have more contact with the health professional than those in the non-biofeedback arms.
Pelvic floor muscle training for prevention and treatment of urinary and faecal incontinence in antenatal and postnatal women.
TLDR
It seemed that the more intensive the programme the greater the treatment effect, and there is some evidence that for women having their first baby, PFMT can prevent urinary incontinence up to six months after delivery.
Pelvic floor muscle training for prevention and treatment of urinary and faecal incontinence in antenatal and postnatal women.
TLDR
The effectiveness of pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) in the prevention or treatment of urinary and faecal incontinence in pregnant or postnatal women is determined and it is uncertain whether antenatal PFMT in incontinent women decreases incontaining in late pregnancy.
There is not yet strong evidence that exercise regimens other than pelvic floor muscle training can reduce stress urinary incontinence in women: a systematic review.
TLDR
There is not yet strong evidence that alternative exercise regimens can reduce urinary leakage in women with stress urinary incontinence, and these regimens should not yet be recommended for use in clinical practice.
Pelvic floor muscle training for prevention and treatment of urinary and faecal incontinence in antenatal and postnatal women.
TLDR
It seemed that the more intensive the programme the greater the treatment effect of pelvic floor muscle training, and there is some evidence that PFMT in women having their first baby can prevent urinary incontinence in late pregnancy and postpartum.
Pelvic floor muscle training for urgency urinary incontinence in women: a systematic review
TLDR
Evidence suggests that physiotherapy techniques may be beneficial for the treatment of UUI and there are insufficient data to determine if pelvic physiotherapy improves urinary frequency or nocturia.
Effect of Weight Training with Pelvic Floor Muscle Training in Elderly Women with Urinary Incontinence
TLDR
Compared to pelvic floor muscle training alone, the combination of weight training and pelvic floor Muscle training provided earlier improvement of UI in elderly women.
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References

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Pelvic floor muscle training for urinary incontinence in women.
TLDR
Pelvic floor muscle training appeared to be an effective treatment for adult women with stress or mixed incontinence, in comparison to no treatment or other treatment options.
Weighted vaginal cones for urinary incontinence.
TLDR
There is some evidence that weighted vaginal cones are better than no active treatment in women with stress urinary incontinence and may be of similar effectiveness to PFMT and electrostimulation.
A randomized controlled trial of duloxetine alone, pelvic floor muscle training alone, combined treatment and no active treatment in women with stress urinary incontinence.
TLDR
The data support significant efficacy of combined PFMT and duloxetine in the treatment of women with SUI and hypothesize that complementary modes of action of dulOxetine and PFMT may result in an additive effect of combined treatment.
Controlled trial of pelvic floor exercises in the treatment of urinary stress incontinence in general practice.
TLDR
The most important factor in the success of the treatment of urinary incontinence in women was the patients' motivation, as demonstrated by their adherence to the daily exercises.
Conservative treatment of stress urinary incontinence in women: a systematic review of randomized clinical trials.
TLDR
Based on levels-of-evidence criteria, there is strong evidence to suggest that PFM exercises are effective in reducing the symptoms of SUI and there is little consistency in the studies of electrical stimulation, but when the results are combined there are strong evidence that electrostimulation is superior to sham Electrostimulation, and limited evidence that there is no difference between electrostimulations and other physical therapies.
Behavioral vs drug treatment for urge urinary incontinence in older women: a randomized controlled trial.
CONTEXT Urinary incontinence is a common condition caused by many factors with several treatment options. OBJECTIVE To compare the effectiveness of biofeedback-assisted behavioral treatment with
Long-term effect of treatment of female incontinence in general practice.
  • T. Lagro-Janssen, C. van Weel
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TLDR
A decline in the effect of conservative treatment in the long-term of female incontinence by the general practitioner is found, but the majority of the women are satisfied with their treatment and patient compliance is the key to long- term success.
A comparison of effectiveness of biofeedback and pelvic muscle exercise treatment of stress incontinence in older community-dwelling women.
TLDR
Biofeedback and pelvic muscle exercises are efficacious for sphincteric incompetence in older women and benefits are maintained and improvement continues for at least 6 months postintervention.
Single blind, randomised controlled trial of pelvic floor exercises, electrical stimulation, vaginal cones, and no treatment in management of genuine stress incontinence in women
TLDR
Training of the pelvic floor muscles is superior to electrical stimulation and vaginal cones in the treatment of genuine stress incontinence.
Single-Blind, Randomized, Controlled Trial of Pelvic Floor Muscle Training, Electrical Stimulation, Vaginal Cones, and No Active Treatment in the Management of Stress Urinary Incontinence
TLDR
Pelvic floor exercises, electrical stimulation, and vaginal cones are equally effective treatments and are far superior to no treatment in women with urodynamic stress urinary incontinence.
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