Pelvic and hindlimb musculature of Tyrannosaurus rex (Dinosauria: Theropoda)

@article{Carrano2002PelvicAH,
  title={Pelvic and hindlimb musculature of Tyrannosaurus rex (Dinosauria: Theropoda)},
  author={Matthew T. Carrano and John R. Hutchinson},
  journal={Journal of Morphology},
  year={2002},
  volume={253}
}
In this article, we develop a new reconstruction of the pelvic and hindlimb muscles of the large theropod dinosaur Tyrannosaurus rex. Our new reconstruction relies primarily on direct examination of both extant and fossil turtles, lepidosaurs, and archosaurs. These observations are placed into a phylogenetic context and data from extant taxa are used to constrain inferences concerning the soft‐tissue structures in T. rex. Using this extant phylogenetic bracket, we are able to offer well… Expand
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