Pelvic Floor Muscle Biofeedback in the Treatment of Urinary Incontinence: A Literature Review

@article{Glazer2006PelvicFM,
  title={Pelvic Floor Muscle Biofeedback in the Treatment of Urinary Incontinence: A Literature Review},
  author={Howard I. Glazer and Carolyn D Laine},
  journal={Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback},
  year={2006},
  volume={31},
  pages={187-201}
}
Biofeedback is efficacious in the training of the pelvic floor musculature in order to enhance continence. This article reviews the anatomy and physiology of micturition as the underlying rationale for pelvic floor muscle biofeedback in the treatment of urinary incontinence. It critically reviews 28 studies published in peer reviewed journals from 1975 to 2005 that were prospective, randomized studies with parametric statistical analyses, operationally defined patient selection criteria… Expand
Biofeedback Pelvic Floor Muscle Training for Voiding Dysfunction and Overactive Bladder
TLDR
It is demonstrated that with a proper training program, 76.5% of patients with OAB and voiding dysfunction can achieve improvement in symptoms using biofeedback PFMT, and the severity of frequency urgency symptoms can be reduced and voided volume and Qmax can be increased. Expand
Biofeedback for pelvic floor muscle training in women with stress urinary incontinence: a systematic review with meta-analysis.
TLDR
PFMT with BF does not offer therapeutic benefits over alternative interventions (no training, PFMT alone and vaginal electrical stimulation) for the treatment of female SUI and was no better than alternative interventions in terms of muscle strength measured using a perineometer. Expand
The effects of pelvic floor muscle therapy on symptoms, voiding, and pelvic floor muscle activity parameters in children with overactive bladder
TLDR
This study aimed to investigate the efficacy of biofeedback‐assisted pelvic floor muscle therapy (PFMT) on symptoms, bladder capacity, uroflowmetry, and pelvic floor Muscle activity (PFMA) in children with resistant OAB or dysfunctional voiding (DV) with associated seconder bladder overactivity (Dv/SBO). Expand
The Glazer Protocol: Evidence-Based Medicine Pelvic Floor Muscle (PFM) Surface Electromyography (SEMG)
TLDR
The Glazer Protocol demonstrates how empirically derived and operationally defined SEMG characteristics hold great promise for a better understanding of the pathophysiology of urinary incontinence and can assist in both diagnosis and treatment of this disorder. Expand
Effect of electromyographic biofeedback as an add‐on to pelvic floor muscle exercises on neuromuscular outcomes and quality of life in postmenopausal women with stress urinary incontinence: A randomized controlled trial
To compare the efficacy of pelvic floor muscle exercises (PFME) with and without electromyographic biofeedback (BF) in increasing muscle strength, improving myoelectric activity, and improvingExpand
SURFACE ELECTROMYOGRAPHY (SEMG)
Most practitioners would agree that the main cause of urinary incontinence after RP is sphincter or neurological damage or urethral shortening due to the surgery. The external striated sphincter isExpand
Male Urinary Incontinence
TLDR
It is supported that male UI is significantly associated with urological and abdominal surgery (including radical prostatectomy) and that EMG-BFB for PFMT improves incontinence and quality of life (social embarrassment, limiting behavior, and psychosocial impact) in the three types of UI on an overall basis. Expand
Enhancing self-efficacy and pelvic floormuscle exercise adherence throughsEMG biofeedback: a randomised study
TLDR
Clinic-based sEMG biofeedback does not increase PFME self-efficacy or women’s motivation to adhere to a HEP practice beyond that achieved through instruction using vaginal palpation, and it is suggested that biofeedbacks may be a useful adjunct to teaching PFME. Expand
The Effect of Pelvic Floor Muscle Strengthening Exercise on Urinary Incontinence and Quality of Life in Patients after Prostatectomy: a Randomized Clinical Trial
TLDR
Pelvic floor muscle exercises are recommended as a non-pharmacologic, non-invasive way to control urinary incontinence and enhanced quality of life in patients after Prostatectomy. Expand
Recovery of the pelvic floor after pregnancy and childbirth
TLDR
New clinics in the UK are offering biofeedback and electrical stimulation treatments, pelvic floor and core body exercises and education to help new mothers understand and improve the health of their pelvic floor, address and prevent postnatal complications and maintain good core muscle support. Expand
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References

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Effect of Adding Biofeedback to Pelvic Floor Muscle Training to Treat Urodynamic Stress Incontinence
TLDR
Cure rate was high, and the reduction in urinary leakage after treatment was statistically significant in both groups, however, there was no statistically significant difference in the effect of individual pelvic floor muscle training with and without biofeedback. Expand
Improved continence outcomes with preoperative pelvic floor muscle strengthening exercises.
TLDR
The results of this study showed that starting biofeedback sessions with pelvic floor muscle exercises prior to radical prostatectomy surgery improved patient outcomes. Expand
The role of biofeedback in Kegel exercise training for stress urinary incontinence.
TLDR
The biofeedback group improved the strength and selective control of pelvic floor muscles; the verbal feedback group did not; both groups significantly reduced the frequency of incontinence. Expand
FES-biofeedback versus intensive pelvic floor muscle exercise for the prevention and treatment of genuine stress incontinence.
TLDR
In conclusion, FES-biofeedback proved more effective than simple PFM exercise. Expand
Early post-prostatectomy pelvic floor biofeedback.
TLDR
A treatment program of biofeedback enhanced pelvic floor exercises begun 6 weeks after radical retropubic prostatectomy did not significantly affect continence in this study. Expand
Increase in pelvic floor muscle activity after 12 weeks' training: a randomized prospective pilot study.
TLDR
Preliminary results show a significant improvement compared with the PFMT-alone group in PFMT outcome measures in patients using electromyography-assisted biofeedback training. Expand
Pelvic floor reeducation for stress incontinence: comparing three methods.
TLDR
A study in which two devices -- vaginal cones and pressure biofeedback -- were compared with pelvic floor exercises alone and showed that there was no statistically significant difference between the three modalities. Expand
Biofeedback and Pelvic Floor Exercises for the Rehabilitation of Urinary Stress Incontinence
TLDR
PFM exercises are effective for the treatment of USI; the biofeedback method revealed better PFM strength results with respect to digital palpation. Expand
Comparative Efficacy of Behavioral Interventions in the Management of Female Urinary Incontinence
TLDR
This study examined the relative efficacy of behavioral interventions from the Departments of Adult Health Nursing, Obstetrics and Gynecology, and Biostatistics in the management of stress and urge incontinence in outpatient female populations. Expand
A comparison of effectiveness of biofeedback and pelvic muscle exercise treatment of stress incontinence in older community-dwelling women.
TLDR
Biofeedback and pelvic muscle exercises are efficacious for sphincteric incompetence in older women and benefits are maintained and improvement continues for at least 6 months postintervention. Expand
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