Pelagic Fishing at 42,000 Years Before the Present and the Maritime Skills of Modern Humans

@article{OConnor2011PelagicFA,
  title={Pelagic Fishing at 42,000 Years Before the Present and the Maritime Skills of Modern Humans},
  author={S. O’Connor and Rintaro Ono and C. Clarkson},
  journal={Science},
  year={2011},
  volume={334},
  pages={1117 - 1121}
}
Abundant fish remains from a shelter in East Timor imply that humans were fishing the deep sea by 43,000 years ago. By 50,000 years ago, it is clear that modern humans were capable of long-distance sea travel as they colonized Australia. However, evidence for advanced maritime skills, and for fishing in particular, is rare before the terminal Pleistocene/early Holocene. Here we report remains of a variety of pelagic and other fish species dating to 42,000 years before the present from Jerimalai… Expand
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