Pediatric spinal injury: the very young.

@article{Ruge1988PediatricSI,
  title={Pediatric spinal injury: the very young.},
  author={John R. Ruge and Grant P. Sinson and David G. Mclone and Leonard J. Cerullo},
  journal={Journal of neurosurgery},
  year={1988},
  volume={68 1},
  pages={
          25-30
        }
}
Maturity of the spine and spine-supporting structures is an important variable distinguishing spinal cord injuries in children from those in adults. Clinical data are presented from 71 children aged 12 years or younger who constituted 2.7% of 2598 spinal cord-injured patients admitted to the authors' institutions from June, 1972, to June, 1986. The 47 children with traumatic spinal cord injury averaged 6.9 years of age and included 20 girls (43%). The etiology of the pediatric injuries differed… Expand
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