Peahens do not prefer peacocks with more elaborate trains

@article{Takahashi2008PeahensDN,
  title={Peahens do not prefer peacocks with more elaborate trains},
  author={Mariko Takahashi and Hiroyuki Arita and Mariko Hiraiwa-Hasegawa and Toshikazu Hasegawa},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={2008},
  volume={75},
  pages={1209-1219}
}
The elaborate train of male Indian peafowl, Pavo cristatus, is thought to have evolved in response to female mate choice and may be an indicator of good genes. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of the male train in mate choice using male- and female-centred observations in a feral population of Indian peafowl in Japan over 7 years. We found no evidence that peahens expressed any preference for peacocks with more elaborate trains (i.e. trains having more ocelli, a more… Expand
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Observations of one lek, consisting of 10 males, showed that there was considerable variance in mating success and analysis of female behaviour provided good evidence that this non-random mating is a result of a female preference, supporting Darwin's hypothesis that the peacock's train has evolved, at least in part, as a result. Expand
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