Peacocks with low mating success are more likely to suffer predation

@article{Petrie1992PeacocksWL,
  title={Peacocks with low mating success are more likely to suffer predation},
  author={Marion Petrie},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={1992},
  volume={44},
  pages={585-586}
}
  • M. Petrie
  • Published 1992
  • Biology
  • Animal Behaviour
There is considerable controversy about whatfemales may gain from mate choice in a lekkingspecies where males provide no obvious directbenefits to their offspring (Kirkpatrick & Ryan1991). Some workers have argued that females gaindirect benefits such as safe copulations by matingwith particular lek males (Reynolds & Gross 1990) ;for example, successful lek males may have a lowerchance of having their copulations disrupted andthis is why they are preferred by females. Othersmaintain that… Expand
Improved growth and survival of offspring of peacocks with more elaborate trains
TLDR
Results from a controlled breeding experiment show that the offspring of successful lek peacocks (Pavo cristatus) with the most elaborate trains grow and survive better under nearly natural conditions. Expand
Avian polygyny is most likely in populations with high variability in heritable male fitness
  • M. Petrie, M. Lipsitch
  • Biology
  • Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences
  • 1994
TLDR
It is shown that polygynous mating systems are most likely in populations and species in which there is high heritable variation in male genetic quality, and the invasion and stability conditions for female choice and male display are satisfied whenmale genetic quality is highly variable. Expand
Peahens lay more eggs for peacocks with larger trains
TLDR
It is found that peahens randomly mated to males that vary in the degree of ornament produce more eggs for those peacocks with more elaborate trains, and the possibility that this difference arises as a result of difference between males in their ability to fertilize eggs is found to be unfounded. Expand
Evolution of risk‐taking during conspicuous mating displays
TLDR
A theoretical model of optimal signaling and risk‐taking behavior for males differing in the attractiveness of their signals is developed and it is demonstrated that the asset‐protection principle, which states that individuals with higher future expectations should behave more cautiously, may often be violated. Expand
Pair and extra-pair mating success relative to male quality in red-winged blackbirds
TLDR
It is proposed that the direct advantage realized by older males in extra-pair matings might indicate that experience is important, such that experienced males are better at creating or exploiting the opportunities for extra- Pair mating. Expand
Flight initiation distances in relation to sexual dichromatism and body size in birds from three continents
TLDR
FID differed among continents and the relative difference in FID between sexually monochromatic and sexually dichromatic species was larger in Europe than in Australia and North America, which may be attributed to latitudinal effects of predation. Expand
SEXUAL SELECTION IN A WOLF SPIDER: MALE DRUMMING ACTIVITY, BODY SIZE, AND VIABILITY
TLDR
This study reports active female choice on sexual display that indicates male viability in spiders, and suggests that by actively choosing mates according to male drumming performance, but independently of male body mass, females are preferring viable males as mates. Expand
INTERSEXUAL SELECTION AND REPRODUCTIVE SUCCESS IN THE
TLDR
DNA fingerprinting is used to measure individual pheasants' reproductive success in terms of both hatchlings and surviving offspring and shows that long-spurred males sired more hatchlings, and also that the females' production of surviving offspring correlated with their mate's spur length. Expand
Differential predation cost of a secondary sexual character: sparrowhawk predation on barn swallows
TLDR
There was a negative relationship between degree of sexual ornamentation and predation risk, consistent with the hypothesis that the secondary sexual character is a reliable indicator of quality. Expand
Intersexual Selection and Reproductive Success in the Pheasant Phasianus colchicus
TLDR
DNA fingerprinting is used to measure individual pheasants' reproductive success and indicates that long-spurred males sired more hatchlings and surviving offspring and also that the females' production of surviving offspring correlated with their mate's spur length. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-7 OF 7 REFERENCES
Lekking in the black grouse— a test of male viability
TLDR
It is reported here that by choosing victorious males, females mate with males that are most likely to survive the following six months, which supports a basic assumption of the 'good gene' models. Expand
Costs and Benefits of Female Mate Choice: Is There a Lek Paradox?
TLDR
It is argued that, although females are expected to pay lower costs in noneconomic mating systems, this need not translate into examining fewer males or spending less time in this activity, and there may be no lek paradox. Expand
Peahens prefer peacocks with elaborate trains
TLDR
Observations of one lek, consisting of 10 males, showed that there was considerable variance in mating success and analysis of female behaviour provided good evidence that this non-random mating is a result of a female preference, supporting Darwin's hypothesis that the peacock's train has evolved, at least in part, as a result. Expand
Female choice selects for male sexual tail ornaments in the monogamous swallow
TLDR
In the monogamous swallow, Hirundo rustica, males with experimentally elpngated tail ornaments obtain mates more quickly than males with shorter tails, and enjoy increased reproductive output in one breeding season, suggesting male sexual ornament may also be maintained by female mate choice in monogamous species. Expand
Viability is positively related to degree of ornamentation in male swallows
  • A. Møller
  • Biology
  • Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences
  • 1991
TLDR
Evaluating a natural population of swallows Hirundo rustica provides support for a ‘good genes’ model of sexual selection rather than the alternative models, showing that selection on tail length was not the result of selection on correlated characters. Expand
The evolution of mating preferences and the paradox of the lek
TLDR
There is growing support for direct selection, in which preferences evolve because of their direct effects on female fitness rather than the genetic effects on offspring resulting from mate choice. Expand
Plumage coloration is a sexually selected indicator of male quality
TLDR
Results of field studies indicate that females prefer to mate with colourful males and that plumage brightness correlates with a male's capactity for parental care and perhaps its genotypic quality. Expand