Peacock copulation calls attract distant females

@article{Anoop2013PeacockCC,
  title={Peacock copulation calls attract distant females},
  author={Karunakaran Anoop and Jessica L. Yorzinski},
  journal={Behaviour},
  year={2013},
  volume={150},
  pages={61-74}
}
Males often continuously emit vocalizations during the breeding season that attract female mates. They can also emit calls that are specifically associated with copulations but the function of these copulation calls is often unknown. We explored the function of male copulation calls in wild and captive peafowl (Pavo cristatus) to test whether these calls attract female mating partners. By broadcasting male copulation calls, we assessed whether these playbacks affected female behavior. Females… Expand

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