Paw preferences in cats (Felis silvestris catus) living in a household environment

@article{Pike1997PawPI,
  title={Paw preferences in cats (Felis silvestris catus) living in a household environment},
  author={A. Pike and D. Maitland},
  journal={Behavioural Processes},
  year={1997},
  volume={39},
  pages={241-247}
}
Unrestrained, naı̈ve cats (Felis silvestris catus) (n=48: 28 males and 20 females), living in a natural domestic environment, were studied for paw preferences using a food reaching test. A total of 46% were right-preferent, 44% were left-preferent and 10% were ambilateral. 60% of the cats in our sample used one paw 100% of the time. This preference was stable over time (10 weeks), and was not influenced by the presence of food residue on the cats' non-preferred paw. There was no difference… Expand
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