Paul and the Cross: A Sociological Approach

@article{Barton1982PaulAT,
  title={Paul and the Cross: A Sociological Approach},
  author={Stephen C. Barton},
  journal={Theology},
  year={1982},
  volume={85},
  pages={13 - 19}
}
  • S. Barton
  • Published 1 January 1982
  • Philosophy
  • Theology
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