Patterns of resource-use and competition for mutualistic partners between two species of obligate cleaner fish

@article{Adam2012PatternsOR,
  title={Patterns of resource-use and competition for mutualistic partners between two species of obligate cleaner fish},
  author={Thomas C. Adam and Stephanie S. Horii},
  journal={Coral Reefs},
  year={2012},
  volume={31},
  pages={1149-1154}
}
Cleaner mutualisms on coral reefs, where specialized fish remove parasites from many species of client fishes, have greatly increased our understanding of mutualism, yet we know little about important interspecific interactions between cleaners. Here, we explore the potential for competition between the cleaners Labroides dimidiatus and Labroides bicolor during two distinct life stages. Previous work has demonstrated that in contrast to L. dimidiatus, which establish cleaning stations, adult L… 
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