Patterns of resource use, food quality, and health status of voles (Microtus pennsylvanicus) trapped from fluctuating populations

@article{Bergeron2004PatternsOR,
  title={Patterns of resource use, food quality, and health status of voles (Microtus pennsylvanicus) trapped from fluctuating populations},
  author={Jean Marie Bergeron and Louise Joudoin},
  journal={Oecologia},
  year={2004},
  volume={79},
  pages={306-314}
}
SummaryRecent studies suggest that diet quality is responsible for differential survivorship of vole cohorts (Boonstra and Boag 1987) and spacing behavior of females (Ims 1987). These phenomena have been related either to a lack of or a deterioration in the quality of the preferred food. To test this hypothesis, we compared foods habits, food quality and health status of meadow voles (Microtus pennsylvanicus) from high and low population density phases. In this study, seven plant species… 

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