Patterns of kinship in groups of free-living sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus) revealed by multiple molecular genetic analyses.

@article{Richard1996PatternsOK,
  title={Patterns of kinship in groups of free-living sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus) revealed by multiple molecular genetic analyses.},
  author={Karen R. Richard and Michael C Dillon and Hal Whitehead and Jonathan Wright},
  journal={Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America},
  year={1996},
  volume={93 16},
  pages={8792-5}
}
Mature female sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus) live in socially cohesive groups of 10-30, which include immature animals of both sexes, and within which there is communal care of the young. We examined kinship in such groups using analyses of microsatellite DNA, mitochondrial DNA sequence, and sex-linked markers on samples of sloughed skin collected noninvasively from animals in three groups off the coast of Ecuador. Social groups were defined through photographic identification of… CONTINUE READING
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