Patterns of faunal extinction and paleoclimatic change from mid-Holocene mammoth and polar bear remains, Pribilof Islands, Alaska

@article{Veltre2008PatternsOF,
  title={Patterns of faunal extinction and paleoclimatic change from mid-Holocene mammoth and polar bear remains, Pribilof Islands, Alaska},
  author={Douglas W. Veltre and David Raymond Yesner and Kristine J. Crossen and Russell W. Graham and Joan Brenner Coltrain},
  journal={Quaternary Research},
  year={2008},
  volume={70},
  pages={40 - 50}
}
Abstract Cave, a lava tube cave on St. Paul Island in the Pribilofs, has recently produced a mid-Holocene vertebrate faunal assemblage including woolly mammoth, polar bear, caribou, and Arctic fox. Several dates on the mammoth remains converge on 5700 14C yr BP. These dates, ~ 2300 yr younger than mammoth dates previously published from the Pribilof Islands, make these the youngest remains of proboscideans, and of non-extinct Quaternary megafauna, recovered from North America. Persistence of… Expand
Phylogeographic analysis of the mid-Holocene Mammoth from Qagnaxˆ Cave, St. Paul Island, Alaska
Abstract Remains of a woolly mammoth (Mammuthus primigenius) were found in Qagnaxˆ Cave, a lava tube cave on St. Paul Island in the Pribilof Islands, 500 km west of the Alaskan mainland in the BeringExpand
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