Patterns of endothermy in bumblebee queens, drones and workers

@article{Heinrich2004PatternsOE,
  title={Patterns of endothermy in bumblebee queens, drones and workers},
  author={Bernd Heinrich},
  journal={Journal of comparative physiology},
  year={2004},
  volume={77},
  pages={65-79}
}
  • B. Heinrich
  • Published 20 July 1972
  • Environmental Science
  • Journal of comparative physiology
Summary1.The thoracic temperatures (TTh) of captiveBombus edwardsii queens and drones from the current year approached ambient temperatures (TA) at night, but warm-up was frequent throughout the day.2.ABombus vosnesenskii queen which had initiated nest building maintained TTh nearly continuously between 37.4 and 38.8 °C at night and in the daytime. On the other hand, the TTh of an overwintered queen which was not “broody” was close to TA (about 22 °C), except when the bee walked from the nest… 
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