Patterns of conspecific brood parasitism in zebra finches

@article{Schielzeth2010PatternsOC,
  title={Patterns of conspecific brood parasitism in zebra finches},
  author={Holger Schielzeth and Elisabeth Bolund},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={2010},
  volume={79},
  pages={1329-1337}
}
Why Do Birds Lay Eggs in Conspecifics’ Nests?
TLDR
This work reviews studies that investigate life history aspects of CBP, a female alternative reproductive behavior that resembles interspecific brood parasitism, except that parasitic females lay eggs in the nests of conspecifics.
Linking nest predation with brood parasitism in captive zebra finches: a multi-pair study
TLDR
This study investigated the role of nest loss as a proximate trigger for parasitism in a more naturalistic setting: small groups consisting of three pairs per aviary, and found that females responded to nest removal during the egg-laying period by laying eggs in active neighbouring nests.
Female Zebra Finches Smell Their Eggs
TLDR
The finding that females are capable to smell their own egg may inspire more research on the potential of olfaction involved in egg recognition, especially in cases where visual cues might be limited.
Conspecific Brood Parasitism is Biased Towards Relatives in the Common Black-Headed Gull
TLDR
It is suggested that kin selection is implicated in CBP in the Blackheaded Gull, with cases of parasitism involved nests of females more related than average to the parasitic female.
Nest destruction elicits indiscriminate con- versus heterospecific brood parasitism in a captive bird
TLDR
It is found that zebra finches laid physiologically committed eggs indiscriminately between nests containing conspecific eggs and nests containing heterospespecific eggs (of Bengalese finches, Lonchura striata vars), despite the con- and heterosPEcific eggs differing in both size and coloration.
Social parasitism as an alternative reproductive tactic in a cooperatively breeding cuckoo
TLDR
It is shown that cooperative and parasitic reproductive strategies result in approximately equal fitness pay-offs in the greater ani (Crotophaga major), a long-lived tropical cuckoo, using an 11-year dataset and comprehensive genetic data that enable comparisons of the life-histories of individual females.
Intraspecific avian brood parasites avoid host nests infested by ectoparasites
TLDR
It is shown that parasitic Spotless Starlings (Sturnus unicolor) avoid conspecific nests infested by ectoparasites, and this mechanism suggested here may be employed by intra- and interspecific brood parasites, so it might represent a widespread strategy in nature.
Differential responses to related hosts by nesting and non‐nesting parasites in a brood‐parasitic duck
TLDR
This study provides the first demonstration that nesting and non‐nesting parasites from the same population may use different host selection criteria, as well as investigating their age, structural size, body condition, nesting phenology or total brood size.
Breeding Experience, Alternative Reproductive Strategies and Reproductive Success in a Captive Colony of Zebra Finches (Taeniopygia guttata)
TLDR
Evidence is provided that older females with prior breeding experience are quicker to initiate a clutch with a new partner and have increased success in chick rearing, even in a captive colony of zebra finches with minimal foraging demands and the use of alternative reproductive strategies is associated with previous failed breeding attempts with the same pair partner.
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