Patterns of coalition formation by adult female baboons in Amboseli, Kenya

@article{Silk2004PatternsOC,
  title={Patterns of coalition formation by adult female baboons in Amboseli, Kenya},
  author={J. Silk and S. Alberts and J. Altmann},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={2004},
  volume={67},
  pages={573-582}
}
Coalitionary support in agonistic interactions is generally thought to be costly to the actor and beneficial to the recipient. Explanations for such cooperative interactions usually invoke kin selection, reciprocal altruism or mutualism. We evaluated the role of these factors and individual benefits in shaping the pattern of coalitionary activity among adult female savannah baboons, Papio cynocephalus, in Amboseli, Kenya. There is a broad consensus that, when ecological conditions favour… Expand

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