Patterns of cell death in freshwater colonial cyanobacteria during the late summer bloom

@article{Sigee2007PatternsOC,
  title={Patterns of cell death in freshwater colonial cyanobacteria during the late summer bloom},
  author={David Charles Sigee and Alfred Richard Cecil Selwyn and Patrick Gallois and Andrew P Dean},
  journal={Phycologia},
  year={2007},
  volume={46},
  pages={284 - 292}
}
D.C. Sigee, A. Selwyn, P. Gallois and A.P. Dean. 2007. Patterns of cell death in freshwater colonial cyanobacteria during the late summer bloom. Phycologia 46: 284–292. DOI: 10.2216/06-69.1 The occurrence of senescence (Evans blue staining) and programmed cell death (Hoechst staining/TUNEL reaction) was studied in the colonial cyanobacteria Anabaena flos-aquae and Microcystis flos-aquae during the late summer bloom in a eutrophic lake. Algae were analysed over a seven-day period (three sampling… 
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