Patterns of Xylella fastidiosa Colonization on the Precibarium of Sharpshooter Vectors Relative to Transmission to Plants

@inproceedings{Almeida2006PatternsOX,
  title={Patterns of Xylella fastidiosa Colonization on the Precibarium of Sharpshooter Vectors Relative to Transmission to Plants},
  author={R P P Almeida and A. Purcell},
  year={2006}
}
Abstract Xylella fastidiosa is a bacterial plant pathogen that causes many plant diseases, including Pierce’s disease of grapevines. Sharpshooter leafhopper (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae: Cicadellinae) vectors transmit this bacterium to plants. Although the basic mechanism of pathogen transmission is not completely understood, previous studies implicated the foregut of infected insects as the source of bacterial inoculum because infective nymphs lose transmissibility after molting and no latent… 
Spatiotemporal colonization of Xylella fastidiosa in its vector supports the role of egestion in the inoculation mechanism of foregut-borne plant pathogens.
TLDR
Results support the hypothesis that egestion is a critical part of the X. fastidiosa inoculation mechanism and suggest a cyclical, spatiotemporal pattern of microbial colonization, disappearance, and recolonization in the precibarium.
Transmission of Xylella fastidiosa to Grapevine by the Meadow Spittlebug.
TLDR
Results suggest that P. spumarius has either a limited number of sites in the foregut that may be colonized, or that fluid dynamics in the mouthparts of these insects is different from that in leafhoppers, and the relationship between cell numbers in vectors and plant infection may have under-appreciated consequences to pathogen spread.
Estimating Xylella fastidiosa transmission parameters: decoupling sharpshooter number and feeding period
TLDR
This work provides quantitative estimates of transmission of an economically important pathogen that is analogous to risk models for arthropod‐vectored human and wildlife diseases, and suggests that heterogeneous vector loads may accelerate the disease cycle, increasing the potential for secondary spread in vineyards.
Sharpshooters: a review of what moves Xylella fastidiosa
TLDR
How fundamental principles of vector reproductive biology, behaviour, nutrition and population and community ecology have influenced research on insect vectors is demonstrated and provides insights into priority research areas.
CHAPTER 12: Xylella fastidiosa Vector Transmission Biology
TLDR
This chapter reviews the biology of X. fastidiosa transmission, focusing on a discussion of research findings since the 1940s, rather than providing a complete literature review.
Feeding behavior in relation to spittlebug transmission of Xylella fastidiosa
TLDR
The first insights into the transmission dynamics of the bacterium Xylella fastidiosa by the meadow spittlebug Philaenus spumarius are provided through DC EPG-assisted transmission tests and comparative observations of the probing and feeding behavior of infective versus non-infective vectors on healthy olive plants.
A chitinase is required for Xylella fastidiosa colonization of its insect and plant hosts.
TLDR
Results indicate that adhesion of the chiA mutant strain to vectors may not be impaired, but that cell multiplication is limited, and that ChiA requires other X. fastidiosa protein(s) for its in vitro chitinolytic activity.
Xylella fastidiosa: an examination of a re-emerging plant pathogen.
TLDR
This review focuses on the status of X. fastidiosa pathogenic associations in plant hosts in which the bacterium is either endemic or has been recently introduced.
Xylella fastidiosa Afimbrial Adhesins Mediate Cell Transmission to Plants by Leafhopper Vectors
TLDR
It is proposed that X. fastidiosa colonization of leafhopper vectors is a complex, stepwise process similar to the formation of biofilms on surfaces, and hemagglutinin-like proteins are associated with cell adhesion to polysaccharides.
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In laboratory experiments, the major characteristics of H. coagulata’s transmission of X. fastidiosa to grapevines were the same as reported for other vectors: short or absent latent period; nymphs transmitted but lost infectivity after molting and regainedinfectivity after feeding on infected plants; and infectivity persisted in adults.
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TLDR
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