Patterns of Water Use in Primates

@article{Kempf2009PatternsOW,
  title={Patterns of Water Use in Primates},
  author={Erica Kempf},
  journal={Folia Primatologica},
  year={2009},
  volume={80},
  pages={275 - 294}
}
  • Erica Kempf
  • Published 26 October 2009
  • Environmental Science, Psychology, Biology
  • Folia Primatologica
Aquatic resources are used extensively by many human populations but their role in the ecology of other primate species has been understudied. At least 10% of extant primates interact with aquatic environments, and a more complete understanding of these interactions is needed to get a complete view of primate behaviour. Five major factors appear to most strongly influence primate water use: thermoregulation, display behaviour, range, diet and predation. The ecological and evolutionary… 

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