Patterns in the Fate of Production in Plant Communities

@article{Cebrian1999PatternsIT,
  title={Patterns in the Fate of Production in Plant Communities},
  author={Just Cebrian},
  journal={The American Naturalist},
  year={1999},
  volume={154},
  pages={449 - 468}
}
  • J. Cebrian
  • Published 1 October 1999
  • Biology, Medicine
  • The American Naturalist
I examine, through an extensive compilation of published reports, the nature and variability of carbon flow (i.e., primary production, herbivory, detrital production, decomposition, export, and biomass and detrital storage) in a range of aquatic and terrestrial plant communities. Communities composed of more nutritional plants (i.e., higher nutrient concentrations) lose higher percentages of production to herbivores, channel lower percentages as detritus, experience faster decomposition rates… Expand

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