Patterns Of Development in Late Talkers: Preschool Years

@article{Paul1993PatternsOD,
  title={Patterns Of Development in Late Talkers: Preschool Years},
  author={Rhea Paul},
  journal={Communication Disorders Quarterly},
  year={1993},
  volume={15},
  pages={14 - 7}
}
  • R. Paul
  • Published 1 May 1993
  • Psychology
  • Communication Disorders Quarterly
A group of children was identified as “late talkers” (LT) on the basis of small expressive vocabulary size at 20–34 months of age and matched to a group of normally speaking age-mates. The subjects were followed yearly throughout the preschool period in order to track growth in language and related skills. Results showed that although significant improvement in speech and language skill occurred during the preschool period in the late talkers, a substantial minority of children retained… 

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