Patients with established cancer cachexia lack the motivation and self‐efficacy to undertake regular structured exercise

@article{Wasley2018PatientsWE,
  title={Patients with established cancer cachexia lack the motivation and self‐efficacy to undertake regular structured exercise},
  author={David Wasley and Nichola S Gale and Sioned Roberts and Karianne Backx and Annmarie Nelson and Robert W M van Deursen and Anthony Byrne},
  journal={Psycho‐Oncology},
  year={2018},
  volume={27}
}
Patients with advanced cancer frequently suffer a decline in activities associated with involuntary loss of weight and muscle mass (cachexia). This can profoundly affect function and quality of life. Although exercise participation can maintain physical and psychological function in patients with cancer, uptake is low in cachectic patients who are underrepresented in exercise studies. To understand how such patients' experiences are associated with exercise participation, we investigated… Expand
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