Patients initially diagnosed as ‘warm’ or ‘cold’ CRPS 1 show differences in central sensory processing some eight years after diagnosis: a quantitative sensory testing study

@article{Vaneker2005PatientsID,
  title={Patients initially diagnosed as ‘warm’ or ‘cold’ CRPS 1 show differences in central sensory processing some eight years after diagnosis: a quantitative sensory testing study},
  author={M. Vaneker and O. Wilder-Smith and Patrick Schrombges and Irene de Man-Hermsen and H. Oerlemans},
  journal={Pain},
  year={2005},
  volume={115},
  pages={204-211}
}
  • M. Vaneker, O. Wilder-Smith, +2 authors H. Oerlemans
  • Published 2005
  • Medicine
  • Pain
  • We used quantitative sensory testing (QST) to gain further insight into mechanisms underlying pain in CRPS 1. Specific goals were: (1) to identify altered patterns of sensory processing some 8 years after diagnosis, (2) to document differences in sensory processing between ‘warm’ and ‘cold’ diagnostic subgroups, (3) to determine relationships between changed sensory processing and disease progression regarding pain. The study was performed on a cohort of patients (n=47) clinically diagnosed… CONTINUE READING
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