Patient satisfaction and pain severity as outcomes in pain management: a longitudinal view of one setting's experience.

@article{Ward1996PatientSA,
  title={Patient satisfaction and pain severity as outcomes in pain management: a longitudinal view of one setting's experience.},
  author={S. Ward and D. Gordon},
  journal={Journal of pain and symptom management},
  year={1996},
  volume={11 4},
  pages={
          242-51
        }
}
Longitudinal data from quality assurance studies of pain outcomes (pain severity and patient satisfaction) were critically examined to explore the reasons that patients are satisfied with their care even when they are in pain. Data were acquired from three sources: self-report surveys of patients during inpatient admission or ambulatory clinic visit (N = 306), telephone interviews of patients after discharge (N = 869), and chart reviews (N = 112). These data were compared to baseline data… Expand

Paper Mentions

Assessing clinical outcomes: patient satisfaction with pain management.
TLDR
This study examined the recently revised American Pain Society Patient Outcome Questionnaire (APS-POQ), particularly in regard to results from newly added items and overall reliability and validity, and found that younger patients were more likely to want more pain medication. Expand
Postoperative pain management: study of patients' level of pain and satisfaction with health care providers' responsiveness to their reports of pain.
TLDR
Postoperative patients admitted to a hospital in Hong Kong for surgery, except those receiving local anesthesia, were eligible to enter this study and over 65% of the subjects were satisfied with all levels of health care providers, regarding their postoperative pain management. Expand
Qualitative assessment of hospitalized patients' satisfaction with pain management.
TLDR
The results offer clinicians new insights into how patients respond to pain, which could enable development of patient-oriented approaches to pain management improving quality and effectiveness of care and increasing patient satisfaction. Expand
Pain management outcomes for hospitalized Hispanic patients.
TLDR
Outcomes of pain management and predictors of patient satisfaction in a minority sample of Hispanic inpatients and the emergence of Hispanics as the fastest growing minority group increases the need for research regarding pain management outcomes to plan more effective intervention. Expand
Probing the paradox of patients' satisfaction with inadequate pain management.
TLDR
Cross-sectional data collected in the primary care setting on cancer patients' patterns of pain and pain treatment, beliefs and expectations about pain andPain relief, willingness to report pain and take pain medication, care from the provider, and satisfaction with their pain management suggest the importance of the patient--provider relationship in shaping patient expectations. Expand
Assessing patients' satisfaction and intensity of pain as outcomes in the management of cancer-related pain.
  • V. Panteli, E. Patistea
  • Medicine
  • European journal of oncology nursing : the official journal of European Oncology Nursing Society
  • 2007
TLDR
Clinical outcomes in the management of cancer pain in terms of pain severity, pain relief and satisfaction with pain management are evaluated in a large oncology hospital in Athens, Greece using the American Pain Society's Patient Outcome Questionnaire. Expand
Core aspects of satisfaction with pain management: cancer patients' perspectives.
TLDR
Key findings indicate that for some, the worst pain rating was often brief, even momentary and that being treated right, having a safety net, being in a partnership with their health care team, and having pain treatment that was efficacious were important to the quality of pain management. Expand
Patient Satisfaction with Pain Level in Patients with Cancer.
  • M. Golas, C. Park, D. Wilkie
  • Medicine
  • Pain management nursing : official journal of the American Society of Pain Management Nurses
  • 2016
TLDR
The authors demonstrated that when satisfaction is measured specifically, patients with higher pain intensity are not satisfied, and recommend that researchers use "satisfaction with pain level" instead of "s satisfaction with pain management" as the pain satisfaction outcome. Expand
Is patient satisfaction a legitimate outcome of pain management?
TLDR
Though many items thought to influence patient satisfaction were not closely related to patient-reported satisfaction, they indicate important clinical factors relevant to quality of care, and thus, to continuing quality improvement (CQI) efforts. Expand
Patient Satisfaction With Treatment for Chronic Pain: Predictors and Relationship to Compliance
TLDR
Aspects of the patient-provider interaction, pain relief, and anxiety at treatment onset predicted satisfaction with care and those patients who were more satisfied with their improvement were also more compliant with treatment recommendations, and this relationship was stronger for health care provider-rated compliance. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 14 REFERENCES
Assessment of patient satisfaction utilizing the American Pain Society's Quality Assurance Standards on acute and cancer-related pain.
TLDR
Data from the survey suggest that while patients experienced moderate-to-severe pain and had to wait relatively long periods of time for pain medications, in most cases they were satisfied with their overall pain management. Expand
Perceptions of pain relief after surgery.
TLDR
The results suggest that the standard of postoperative pain relief is poor because of inadequate education of patients in what to expect (and demand), and of medical and nursing staff in how to prescribe and administer analgesia with reference to individual drug response. Expand
Application of the American Pain Society quality assurance standards
TLDR
It appears that patients are satisfied if clinicians say they want to provide pain management regardless of whether they actually do, and the data raise questions about the interpretation of patient satisfaction as an outcome variable in studies of the quality of pain management. Expand
Patient-related barriers to management of cancer pain
TLDR
To explore patients' reluctance to report pain and to use analgesics, 270 patients with cancer completed a 27‐item self‐report questionnaire (BQ) that assessed the extent to which they have concerns about reporting pain and using pain medication. Expand
Methods For Measuring Patient Satisfaction With Specific Medical Encounters
TLDR
In both studies, the E5 scales showed greater response variability and better predicted whether patients intended to return to the same doctor in the future, recommend the doctor to a friend, and comply with the medical regimen. Expand
Identification of patient, medical and nursing staff attitudes to postoperative opioid analgesia: stage 1 of a longitudinal study of postoperative analgesia
TLDR
The survey revealed that there is a continuing prevalence among medical and nursing staff of attitudes and practices likely to contribute to poor postoperative analgesia and these have formed the basis of a new Acute Pain Service. Expand
Patient Attitudes to Postoperative Pain Relief
  • B. Donovan
  • Medicine
  • Anaesthesia and intensive care
  • 1983
A study of the attitudes of general surgical patients to the management of their postoperative pain showed that although 86% initially expressed satisfaction with their postoperative pain relief, aExpand
Improving outcomes of analgesic treatment: is education enough?
  • M. Max
  • Medicine
  • Annals of internal medicine
  • 1990
TLDR
Interventions may include monitoring and displaying patient pain ratings routinely, making available educational tools to assist optimal drug ordering, encouraging patients to communicate about unrelieved pain, reviewing quality assurance of pain treatment regimens, increasing behavioral research into analgesic prescribing, and selectively modifying narcotics regulatory practices. Expand
The Relationship Between Patients' Satisfaction With Their Physicians and Perceptions About Interventions They Desired and Received
TLDR
Perceptions about nontechnical interventions were better predictors of patient satisfaction than perceptions about technical interventions. Expand
Analyzing patient satisfaction: a multianalytic approach.
A telephone survey of 9% of first quarter discharges at The New York Hospital was undertaken to identify the dimensions of a patient satisfaction questionnaire and the determinants of patientExpand
...
1
2
...