Patient and public involvement in emergency care research

@article{Hirst2016PatientAP,
  title={Patient and public involvement in emergency care research},
  author={Enid Hirst and Andy Irving and Steve Goodacre},
  journal={Emergency Medicine Journal},
  year={2016},
  volume={33},
  pages={665 - 670}
}
Patients participate in emergency care research and are the intended beneficiaries of research findings. The public provide substantial funding for research through taxation and charitable donations. If we do research to benefit patients and the public are funding the research, then patients and the public should be involved in the planning, prioritisation, design, conduct and oversight of research, yet patient and public involvement (or more simply, public involvement, since patients are also… 
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