Pathogens and sex in plants

@article{Parker2005PathogensAS,
  title={Pathogens and sex in plants},
  author={Matthew A. Parker},
  journal={Evolutionary Ecology},
  year={2005},
  volume={8},
  pages={560-584}
}
  • M. Parker
  • Published 1 September 1994
  • Biology
  • Evolutionary Ecology
SummaryExtant theories that attribute the evolution of sex to pathogen attack depend on the assumption that pathogens are narrowly specialized, so that high fitness on one host genotype results in poor fitness on hosts with other allele combinations. This assumption is necessary in order for frequency-dependent selection to produce sustained cycling of gametic disequilibrium across the host's disease resistance loci, which makes recombination advantageous. However, a review of numerous genetic… 
Host‐Parasite Coevolution and Selection on Sex through the Effects of Segregation
The advantage of producing novel variation to keep apace of coevolving species has been invoked as a major explanation for the evolution and maintenance of sex (the Red Queen hypothesis). Recent
The coevolution of plants and viruses: resistance and pathogenicity.
TLDR
Evidence supporting plant-virus coevolution is reviewed and areas in need of attention to understand the role of viruses in plant ecosystem dynamics, and the factors that determine virus emergence in crops are pointed to.
Parasites and deleterious mutations: interactions influencing the evolutionary maintenance of sex
TLDR
It is shown how interactions between these genetic and ecological forces can completely reverse predictions about the evolution of reproductive modes and it is demonstrated that synergistic interactions between infection and deleterious mutations can render sex evolutionarily stable even when there is antagonistic epistasis among deleteriously mutations, thereby widening the conditions for the evolutionary maintenance of sex.
The Genetic Basis of Host Resistance to Pathogens : Models and the Maintenance of Genetic Variation
Not all hosts respond in the same way to invading pathogens and understanding the cause of this variation in host response is important in coevolutionary and disease biology. Three models have been
Epidemiology and disease-control under gene-for-gene plant-pathogen interaction.
TLDR
The optimal 'multiline' control, which makes use of several different resistant varieties, that minimizes the expected degree of crop damages caused by epidemic outbreaks of the pathogen is theoretically explored.
Ample genetic variation but no evidence for genotype specificity in an all‐parthenogenetic host–parasitoid interaction
TLDR
There is no evidence for genotype specificity in the interaction between A. fabae and L. fabarum, suggesting that the observed variation is based on rather general mechanisms of defence and attack.
Host specificity and genetics of host resistance in the "Daphnia-Pasteuria" host-parasite system
TLDR
Both the findings on host specificity and the genetics of host resistance suggest that Daphnia and Pasteuria have the potential to undergo antagonistic coevolution by negative frequency dependent selection.
EXPERIMENTAL EVOLUTION OF RESISTANCE IN PARAMECIUM CAUDATUM AGAINST THE BACTERIAL PARASITE HOLOSPORA UNDULATA
TLDR
This study indicates de novo evolution of host resistance, associated with both direct and indirect costs, and illustrates how interactions with parasites can lead to the genetic divergence of initially identical populations.
Adaptive value of sex in microbial pathogens.
  • R. Michod, H. Bernstein, A. Nedelcu
  • Biology, Medicine
    Infection, genetics and evolution : journal of molecular epidemiology and evolutionary genetics in infectious diseases
  • 2008
TLDR
The adaptive value of sex in microbial pathogens is considered and it is concluded that in terms of short-term benefits, the DNA repair hypothesis has the most support and is the most generally applicable hypothesis in this group.
Genotypic Variation and the Role of Defensive Endosymbionts in an All-Parthenogenetic Host-Parasitoid Interaction
TLDR
Aphis fabae raises the question why H. defensa does not go to fixation and highlights the need to develop new models to understand the dynamics of endosymbiont-mediated coevolution, and suggests that possessing symbionts may also be favorable in the absence of parasitoids.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 125 REFERENCES
Coevolutionary genetics of plants and pathogens
  • S. Frank
  • Biology
    Evolutionary Ecology
  • 2005
TLDR
The genetic polymorphism maintained by host-pathogen coevolution is analysed in a multilocus model that predicts that the number of resistance alleles in each host plant follows a binomial distribution that depends on the cost to the pathogen for carrying virulence alleles.
Pathogens as Causes of Genetic Diversity in their Host Populations
TLDR
Models on these lines can account for correlation of stable sexual reproduction with size and longevity and with biotic complexity of habitat, abundance of protein polymorphism, diversity of adaptive linkage values, and “good genes” mate choice and the excesses of sexual selection.
Genetic Uniformity and Disease Resistance in a Clonal Plant
TLDR
Invulnerability to pathogen counter-adaptation may be a common property of plant morphological defenses that function by limiting pathogen access to infection sites, and may permit natural populations of clonal plants to coexist with pathogens, regardless of their degree of genetic uniformity.
Ecological and genetic models of host-pathogen coevolution
TLDR
A model is presented to analyse the forces that maintain genetic polymorphism in interactions between host plants and their pathogens, showing that ecological and demographic factors, such as birth and death rates, often have a more profound effect on the amount of polymorphism than genetic parameters.
SELECTION PRESSURES AND PLANT PATHOGENS
TLDR
The empirical evidence of the existence of stabilizing selection in systems of vertical resistance and virulence is summarized and a mathematical model illustrating the forces of selection and their effects on the frequencies of genes R and V is presented.
Sex versus non-sex versus parasite
TLDR
It is shown that with frequency dependence sufficiently intense such models generate cycles, and that in certain states of cycling sexual species easily obtain higher long-term geometric mean fitness than any competing monotypic asexual species or mixture of such.
Complementary Genetic Control of Differential Compatibility in Rusts
A genetic analysis of pathogenic and antigenic specificity of Puccinia sorghi on four dominant alleles at the Rp locus and on two recessive alleles for resistance in lines of corn permits a
NONADAPTIVE EVOLUTION OF DISEASE RESISTANCE IN AN ANNUAL LEGUME
  • M. Parker
  • Biology, Medicine
    Evolution; international journal of organic evolution
  • 1991
TLDR
Local populations of the plant Amphicarpaea bracteata often contain genetically divergent lineages that differ strongly in disease resistance toward the specialist pathogen Synchytrium decipiens, resulting in strong correlations between disease resistance and other ecologically important characters.
Pathogens, polymorphism, and the evolution of sex.
  • J. Tooby
  • Biology, Medicine
    Journal of theoretical biology
  • 1982
TLDR
The ecological and life-historical correlates of parthenogenesis, inbreeding, chromosome number, and polymorphism are consistent with the hypothesis that adaptation to one host genotype is negatively correlated with adaptation to others when host genotypes are sufficiently differentiated.
Sexual reproduction as an adaptation to resist parasites (a review).
TLDR
P parasite coevolution is superior to previous models of the evolution of sex by supporting the stability of sex under the following challenging conditions: very low fecundity, realistic patterns of genotype fitness and changing environment, and frequent mutation to parthenogenesis, even while sex pays the full 2-fold cost.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...