Pathogenic Escherichia coli

@article{Kaper2004PathogenicEC,
  title={Pathogenic Escherichia coli},
  author={James B. Kaper and James P Nataro and Harry L. T. Mobley},
  journal={Nature Reviews Microbiology},
  year={2004},
  volume={2},
  pages={123-140}
}
Few microorganisms are as versatile as Escherichia coli. An important member of the normal intestinal microflora of humans and other mammals, E. coli has also been widely exploited as a cloning host in recombinant DNA technology. But E. coli is more than just a laboratory workhorse or harmless intestinal inhabitant; it can also be a highly versatile, and frequently deadly, pathogen. Several different E. coli strains cause diverse intestinal and extraintestinal diseases by means of virulence… 
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