Pathogenesis of haemophilic synovitis: experimental studies on blood‐induced joint damage

@article{Valentino2007PathogenesisOH,
  title={Pathogenesis of haemophilic synovitis: experimental studies on blood‐induced joint damage},
  author={L. Valentino and N. Hakobyan and N. Rodriguez and W. K. Hoots},
  journal={Haemophilia},
  year={2007},
  volume={13}
}
Summary.  Hemarthrosis is a common manifestation of haemophilia, and joint arthropathy remains a frequent complication. Even though the exact mechanisms related to blood‐induced joint disease have not yet been fully elucidated, it is likely that iron deposition in the synovium induces an inflammatory response that causes not only immune system activation but also stimulates angiogenesis. This process ultimately results in cartilage and bone destruction. Investigating the processes that occur in… Expand
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Blood‐induced joint disease: the pathophysiology of hemophilic arthropathy
  • L. Valentino
  • Medicine
  • Journal of thrombosis and haemostasis : JTH
  • 2010
TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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Blood-induced joint damage: from mechanisms to clinical practice
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