Pathogenesis of group A streptococcal infections.

@article{Cunningham2000PathogenesisOG,
  title={Pathogenesis of group A streptococcal infections.},
  author={Madeleine W. Cunningham},
  journal={Clinical microbiology reviews},
  year={2000},
  volume={13 3},
  pages={
          470-511
        }
}
  • M. Cunningham
  • Published 1 July 2000
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Clinical microbiology reviews
Group A streptococci are model extracellular gram-positive pathogens responsible for pharyngitis, impetigo, rheumatic fever, and acute glomerulonephritis. A resurgence of invasive streptococcal diseases and rheumatic fever has appeared in outbreaks over the past 10 years, with a predominant M1 serotype as well as others identified with the outbreaks. emm (M protein) gene sequencing has changed serotyping, and new virulence genes and new virulence regulatory networks have been defined. The emm… 
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Two nonsuppurative sequelae of group A streptococcal infections, acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and acute glomerulonephritis (AGN), are the most significant health problems stemming from group A streaks worldwide.
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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