Pathogenesis and genetics of pre-eclampsia

@article{Roberts2001PathogenesisAG,
  title={Pathogenesis and genetics of pre-eclampsia},
  author={Jm Roberts and Dw Cooper},
  journal={The Lancet},
  year={2001},
  volume={357},
  pages={53-56}
}
Pre-eclampsia--still a disease of theories.
TLDR
The search for the underlying cause of this disorder and for a clinical marker to predict which women will develop pre-eclampsia is ongoing, with its prevention being the ultimate goal.
Pre-eclampsia and thrombophilia.
  • J. Said, G. Dekker
  • Medicine, Biology
    Best practice & research. Clinical obstetrics & gynaecology
  • 2003
Genetic studies of pre-eclampsia
TLDR
The investigations provide an insight into a potential role of a new susceptibility locus for pre-eclampsia at 9p21 in the Finnish population and systematic efforts to narrow down the linkage region by fine-mapping followed by association analysis are presented.
Hypertensive diseases and eclampsia
TLDR
A review of recent advances relating to research into the aetiology and pathogenesis of pre-eclampsia will conclude with a brief update on current therapeutic strategies.
The Genetic Aspects of Pre-eclampsia: Achievements and Limitations
TLDR
Large-scale studies entailing genomewide scanning, sib-pair linkage analysis, and family-based association studies with appropriate power to detect genes with a lower relative risk are necessary to understand the puzzle of pre-eclampsia.
Developmental Biology: Frontiers for Clinical Genetics
TLDR
Comparison of three different mouse models suggests that pre-eclampsia can be initiated by at least three independent mechanisms: pre-existing borderline maternal hypertension that is exacerbated by pregnancy (BPH/5 strain of mice), elevated levels of the vasoconstrictor angiotensin II in the maternal circulation by placental over-production of renin (renin/angiotens inogen transgenic mice), and placental pathology (p57 mutant mice).
Emerging technologies for the identification of therapeutic targets for the management of pre-eclampsia
TLDR
Emerging experimental systems and increasingly specific analytical methods for the study of differences between normal and pre-eclamptic placentae are close to identifying specific indicators of disease, which may allow early diagnosis and intervention and reveal targets against which therapeutic agents can be developed.
The genetics of pre‐eclampsia: a feto‐placental or maternal problem?
  • J. Cross
  • Medicine, Biology
    Clinical genetics
  • 2003
TLDR
Comparison of three different mouse models suggests that pre‐eclampsia can be initiated by at least three independent mechanisms: pre‐existing borderline maternal hypertension that is exacerbated by pregnancy (BPH/5 strain of mice), elevated levels of the vasoconstrictor angiotensin II in the maternal circulation by placental over‐production of renin (renin/angiotens inogen transgenic mice), and placental pathology (p57Kip2 mutant mice).
Pre-eclampsia: the pivotal role of the placenta in its pathophysiology and markers for early detection
TLDR
The role of the placenta in the pathophysiology of pre-eclampsia and recent markers that may predict its onset are discussed.
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References

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Genetics of Pre-Eclampsia
TLDR
The evidence that Pre-eclampsia is genetic in origin is reviewed, with the most decisive data supporting this conclusion seen in blood relatives but not in relatives by marriage, which suggests that the condition is caused by maternal genes.
An exclusion map for pre-eclampsia: assuming autosomal recessive inheritance.
TLDR
An exclusion map is constructed by using both candidate genes and random DNA markers on a panel of two-generation families in which pre-eclampsia was rigorously defined and no evidence was found for linkage to the HLA region or to several genes implicated in the pathogenesis of hypertension.
Genetic control of susceptibility to eclampsia and miscarriage
TLDR
It is argued that this suggests that the primary mode of action of the gene(s) involved is to affect the interaction between uterine and placental tissue, in contrast to previous findings that susceptibility to pre‐eclampsia is controlled solely by the maternal genotype.
Genetic control of severe pre-eclampsia.
A genetic analysis has been made of published and new data on the familial occurrence of severe pre-eclampsia in primigravid women. This has shown that the condition may be largely a Mendelian
What Is the Place of Genetics in the Pathogenesis of Pre-Eclampsia?
It is most unlikely that there is a single ‘pre-eclampsia (PE) gene’. We are probably looking for a cluster of polymorphisms which, possibly in conjunction with environmental factors, predispose to th
A molecular variant of angiotensinogen associated with preeclampsia
TLDR
In a series of Caucasian women with pregnancy–induced hypertension, a significant association of preeclampsia with a molecular variant of angiotensinogen, T235, found previously to be associated with essential hypertension is observed, which support a new pathophysiological interpretation of preeClampsia and of its relation to some forms of essential hypertension.
The L10F mutation of angiotensinogen is rare in pre‐eclampsia
TLDR
The authors detected no mutation of codon 10 in angiotensinogen in any of the 32 women studied, indicating that this mutation is not commonly associated with proteinuric pre-eclampsia.
Association of pre-eclampsia with common coding sequence variations in the lipoprotein lipase gene.
TLDR
It is concluded that carriers of N291S or combined D9N/ - 93T --> G mutations in the LPL gene are at substantially increased risk of pre-eclampsia.
A genome-wide scan reveals a maternal susceptibility locus for pre-eclampsia on chromosome 2p13.
TLDR
This work reports the results of a genome-wide screen of Icelandic families representing 343 affected women and detects a significant locus on 2p13 with a lod score of 4.70, the first reported locus for pre-eclampsia meeting the criteria for genome- wide significance.
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