Path integration in mammals

@article{Etienne2004PathII,
  title={Path integration in mammals},
  author={A. S. Etienne and Kate J. Jeffery},
  journal={Hippocampus},
  year={2004},
  volume={14}
}
It is often assumed that navigation implies the use, by animals, of landmarks indicating the location of the goal. However, many animals (including humans) are able to return to the starting point of a journey, or to other goal sites, by relying on self‐motion cues only. This process is known as path integration, and it allows an agent to calculate a route without making use of landmarks. We review the current literature on path integration and its interaction with external, location‐based cues… Expand

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