Paternal inheritance of a female moth's mating preference

@article{Iyengar2002PaternalIO,
  title={Paternal inheritance of a female moth's mating preference},
  author={Vikram K. Iyengar and H. Kern Reeve and Thomas Eisner},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2002},
  volume={419},
  pages={830-832}
}
Females of the arctiid moth Utetheisa ornatrix mate preferentially with larger males, receiving both direct phenotypic and indirect genetic benefits. Here we demonstrate that the female's mating preference is inherited through the father rather than the mother, indicating that the preference gene or genes lie mostly or exclusively on the Z sex chromosome, which is strictly paternally inherited by daughters. Furthermore, we show that the preferred male trait and the female preference for that… 

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